Blog

The importance of digital accessibility

More and more, we use websites and web applications in our day-to-day lives. We should ensure digital environments are as usable and welcoming as possible and weave accessibility into our daily work.
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Writing a personal ReadMe for work

Creating personal documentation can provide helpful context to your coworkers as you collaborate with each other. In this post, we’ll talk about the benefits (and caveats) of building a work ReadMe for yourself.
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Sending accessible emails

It may not seem like it, but there are accessibilty concerns for emails as well! This post will list a few techniques to help improve the accessibility of the emails you send.
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Accessible social media

Many of us use social media daily, but far less of us stop to consider how to make that content usable for more than just an abled audience. This post will list a few techniques to help improve the accessibility of your social media posts.
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How I keep a work journal

This is a short post that provides a high-level overview of my specific note-taking process for work. I don’t have a catchy name for this process, and I’m not trying to be prescriptive or convince you to use it yourself. This is just a reference post that you may find helpful while you figure out what sort of note-taking process works for you.
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Creating accessible presentations

There are a number of ways that you can improve the accessibilty of your slides and the way your present them. This post will go over some of the most common methods and principles that you can use to ensure as many people as possible can experience your presentation.
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Taking notes while working

I’ve been taking notes while I work for most of my career. While I’ve always found them to be useful, they’ve continued to become even more important to me with each passing year. To give you some ideas of why you might want to consider taking notes, I’ve provided a few examples in this post.
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Accessibility confidence testing

This post provides a quick overview of confidence testing in the context of web accessibility, including caveats, benefits, and example tools.
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Semantic HTML: a quick primer

In this post, we’ll talk about the basics of semantic HTML elements and why they’re important to think about when you’re building a web page.
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Returning to an old project

Sometimes projects have to be put on hiatus. Other things get in the way. Focus can shift over time. I end up returning to old stuff pretty often, so I’ve written down the set of questions I use to reapproach paused projects.
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Adding context to your code

Context is key to helping us understand our software, especially when we look at that software later. Comments and commits occupy an important space in how we understand what we’re building.
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Creating a multi-source time-lapse

Putting together a time-lapse can be a fun reminder of the time you spent working on a project. This is the process I’ve used to create time-lapses for various projects.
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Using Jekyll Liquid templating to build a website gallery

I keep all of the games I work on in a gallery page on this site. Earlier this year, I finished building a game with some friends, and had to update that page.
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Preparing for a game jam

I’ve put together a small list of things I find helpful to do before and during a game jam. Some of these suggestions may seem obvious, but you’d be surprised how easy it is to forget things when a deadline is approaching.
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Tools for making games

This post accumulates the tools I use when I make games. I use most of the things on this list frequently. Tools that are free and/or open source are marked. Most of the games I make are digital. I use Microsoft Windows on my computer, though most of the software tools here are also available for other platforms.
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